Books with pictures

Reading / browsing books with lots of pictures is like, well, watching a good documentary on television. Or better?

These days I sometimes browse through Vic Gatrell’s City of Laughter, a very detailed account of the satirical prints published in London between 1760 and 1820: with lots of color-illustrations. The text is a bit too detailed for the level of my interest in 18th century London culture, but the prints are great. Review in the Guardian: http://books.guardian.co.uk/reviews/history/0,,1933468,00.html.

Less academic – so closer to watching a documentary on tevee is The Seventy Great Journeys in History, published by Thames and Hudson. I love a book like this for the pleasurable way in which it fills gaps in my knowledge. And it’s nothing I have to know for any special reason.

I love clicking from one wikipedia-entry to another too as a way of discovering, filling in gaps and learning, but sometimes you just want to lie in a chair with a picture book.

en,reading matter,ubiscribe | November 4, 2007 | 17:59 | comments (1) |

1 Comment

  1. […] November 10th, 2007 · No Comments 1.  The Guardian has a nice review of Vic Gattrell’s City of Laughter.  Has anyone used this for their courses? (Courtesy of ariealt.net) […]

    Pingback by Short takes . . . . « The Long Eighteenth | 11 November 2007 | 0:09 |

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